Anomaly Detection in Multivariate Non-stationary Time Series for Automatic DBMS Diagnosis

Anomaly Detection in Multivariate Non-stationary Time Series for Automatic DBMS Diagnosis

ABSTRACT— Anomaly detection in database management systems (DBMSs) is difficult because of increasing number of statistics (stat) and event metrics in big data system. In this paper, I propose an automatic DBMS diagnosis system that detects anomaly periods with abnormal DB stat metrics and finds causal events in the periods. Reconstruction error from deep autoencoder and statistical process control approach are applied to detect time period with anomalies. Related events are found using time series similarity measures between events and abnormal stat metrics. After training deep autoencoder with DBMS metric data, efficacy of anomaly detection is investigated from other DBMSs containing anomalies. Experiment results show effectiveness of proposed model, especially, batch temporal normalization layer. Proposed model is used for publishing automatic DBMS diagnosis reports in order to determine DBMS configuration and SQL tuning.

CONCLUSION AND FUTURE WORK I proposed a machine learning model for automatic DBMS diagnosis. The proposed model detects anomaly periods from reconstruct error with deep autoencoder. I also verified empirically that temporal normalization is essential when input data is non-stationary multivariate time series. With SPC approach, time period is considered anomaly period when reconstruction error is outside of control limit. According types or users of DBMSs, decision rules that are used in SPC can be added. For example, warning line with 2 sigma can be utilized to decide whether it is anomaly or not [12, 13]. In this paper, anomaly detection test is proceeded in other DBMSs whose data is not used in training, because performance of basic pre-trained model is important in service providers’ perspective. Efficacy of detection performance is validated with blind test and DBAs’ opinions. The result of automatic anomaly diagnosis would help DB consultants save time for anomaly periods and main wait events. Thus, they can concentrate on only making solution when DB disorders occur. For better performance of anomaly detection, additional training can be proceeded after pre-trained model is adopted. In addition, recurrent and convolutional neural network can be used in reconstruction part to capture hidden representation of sequential and local relationship. If anomaly labeled data is generated, detection result can be analyzed with numerical performance measures. However, in practice, it is hard to secure labeled anomaly dataset according to each DBMS. Proposed model is meaningful in unsupervised anomaly detection model that doesn’t need labeled data and can be generalized to other DBMSs with pre-trained model

Anomaly Detection in Multivariate Non-stationary Time Series for Automatic DBMS Diagnosis

Anomaly Detection in Multivariate Non-stationary Time Series for Automatic DBMS Diagnosis

Very Deep Convolutional Networks for Large-Scale Image Recognition

ABSTRACT In this work we investigate the effect of the convolutional network depth on its accuracy in the large-scale image recognition setting. Our main contribution is a thorough evaluation of networks of increasing depth using an architecture with very small ( 3 × 3) convolution filters, which shows that a significant improvement on the prior-art configurations can be achieved by pushing the depth to 16–19 weight layers. These findings were the basis of our ImageNet Challenge 2014 submission, where our team secured the first and the second places in the localisation and classification tracks respectively. We also show that our representations generalise well to other datasets, where they achieve state-of-the-art results. We have made our two best-performing ConvNet models publicly available to facilitate further research on the use of deep visual representations in computer vision

CONCLUSION In this work we evaluated very deep convolutional networks (up to 19 weight layers) for largescale image classification. It was demonstrated that the representation depth is beneficial for the classification accuracy, and that state-of-the-art performance on the ImageNet challenge dataset can be achieved using a conventional ConvNet architecture (LeCun et al., 1989; Krizhevsky et al., 2012) with substantially increased depth. In the appendix, we also show that our models generalise well to a wide range of tasks and datasets, matching or outperforming more complex recognition pipelines built around less deep image representations. Our results yet again confirm the importance of depth in visual representations.

Very Deep Convolutional Networks for Large-Scale Image Recognition